Lifeline Education Charter School

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School Policies » Academic Dishonesty Policy

Academic Dishonesty Policy

Lifeline desires to promote a positive learning environment in which students are challenged academically and intellectually. Teachers and administrators will not tolerate academic dishonesty in any form. Lifeline has adopted the following guidelines to address instances of academic dishonest.

Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Cheating on Exams
  2. Copying from others or plagiarism of any kind.
  3. Having or using notes, formulas, or other information in a programmable calculator or other electronic device without explicit teacher review and permission.
  4. Having or using a communication device such as a cell phone, pager, PDA, or electronic translator to send or obtain unauthorized information.
  5. Taking an exam for another student, or permitting someone else to take a test for you.
  6. Asking another to give you improper assistance, including offering money or other benefits.
  7. Asking for or accepting money or any other benefit in return for giving another improper assistance.
  8. Providing or receiving information about all or part of an exam, including answers (e.g., telling someone in a subsequent period what was on your exam, or being told this information).
  9. Having or using a “cheat sheet” (a piece of paper with answers, formulas, information, or notes of any kind) that is not specifically authorized by the teacher.
  10. Altering a graded exam and resubmitting it for a better grade.
  11. Working together on a take-home exam, unless specifically authorized by the teacher.
  12. Gaining or providing unauthorized access to examination materials.
  13. Misrepresenting your academic accomplishments, such as by tampering with computer records.
  14. Deceiving a teacher or making up a false reason or excuse to get special consideration on an exam or an extension for an exam or paper.
  15. Failing to promptly stop work on an exam when the time allocated has elapsed.
  16. Forging a signature.
  17. Hoarding or damaging library materials.

NOTE: Attempted academic dishonesty, even if unsuccessful, is treated as academic dishonesty. Simply having possession during an exam of any prohibited or unauthorized information or device, whether or not it is actually used, is an act of academic dishonesty and will be dealt with as such.

Cheating includes the following:

  1. Copying from others.
  2. Having or using notes, formulas or other information in a programmable calculator or other electronic device without explicit teacher review and permission.
  3. Having or using a communication device such as a cell phone, pager, PDA, or electronic translator to send or obtain unauthorized information.
  4. Taking an exam for another student, or permitting someone else to take a test for you.
  5. Asking another to give you improper assistance, including offering money or other benefits.
  6. Asking for or accepting money or any other benefit in return for giving another improper assistance.
  7. Providing or receiving information about all or part of an exam, including answers (e.g., telling someone in a subsequent period what was on your exam, or being told this information).

Plagiarism includes the following:

  1. Giving or getting improper assistance on an assignment meant to be individual work. (When in doubt, ask.)
  2. Including in any assignment turned in for credit any materials not based on your own research and writing. This includes:
    1. Using the services of a commercial term paper company.
    2. Using the services of another student.
    3. Copying part or all of another person’s paper and submitting it as your own for an assignment.
  3. Acting as provider of paper(s) for a student or students.
  4. Submitting substantial portions of the same academic work for credit in more than one course without consulting both teachers (self-plagiarism).
  5. Failing to use quotation marks where appropriate.
  6. Failing to properly acknowledge paraphrased materials via textual attribution, footnotes, endnotes and/or a bibliography.
  7. Making up data for an experiment (“fudging data”).
  8. Citing nonexistent sources (articles, books, etc.).

 

Cheating/Academic Dishonesty – Consequences

Cheating undermines the process of learning and teaching and is a very serious breach of discipline. In all cases of cheating, whether on a homework assignment, a quiz, test, examination, report, or essay assignment, the teacher in whose class the student’s infraction occurred will the document and report the infraction to Administration, and will notify the student’s parents of the infraction. Furthermore, the student will lose all credit for the assignment in question. For repeated offenses of cheating, consequences that are more stringent will apply. The following guidelines for consequences are applicable to instances of cheating:

 

Homework, Quizzes and Tests, Plagiarism

First offense:

A. Teacher documents and reports to the Administration.

B. Student receives a “0” on the assignment/quiz/test.

C. Parents receive notification.

D. Student receives assignment to Saturday School.

 

Second offense:

A. Teacher documents and reports to the Administration

B. Student receives a “0” on the assignment/quiz/test.

C. Parents receive notification.

D. Student receives on-campus suspension (1-3 days).

E. Student/parent sign Academic Honesty Contract.

 

Third offense:

A. Teacher documents and reports to the Administration.

B. Parents receive notification.

C. Student receives a short-term suspension (1-3 days).

D. Parent conference.

 

Fourth offense:

A. Teacher documents and reports to the Administration.

B. Parents receive notification.

C. Student receives a short-term suspension (1-3 days).

D. Parent conference.

E. Student placed on Behavior Modification/Zero Tolerance Contract.

Final Exams

First offense:

A. Teacher documents and reports to the Administration.

B. Student receives an “F” for the exam.

C. Parents receive notification.

D. Recommendation for further disciplinary action.

 

Second offense:

A. Teacher documents and reports to the Administration.

B. Student receives an “F” for the semester.

C. Parents are notified/conference.

D. Student placed on Behavior Modification/Zero Tolerance Contract.
E. Recommendation for further disciplinary action.

Complaint Procedure

Concerns such as hiring and evaluation of staff, classroom assignments, pupil advancement and retention, selection/provision of textbooks and materials, pupil discipline, provision of core curricula subjects, facilities, graduation requirements, homework policies and practices, use of general education funds, and dress codes and school uniforms can be addressed by the school.

Please follow the following guidelines in communicating your complaints:

  1. Teacher – please contact the teacher immediately with any complaints and concerns
  2. Administrator – if the situation cannot be resolved by the teacher, please contact the site administrator
  3. Executive Director – if the teacher and the site administrator could not satisfactory resolve your complaint, please contact our Executive Director.

Uniform Complaint Procedure
Some matters lie within the Uniform Complaint Procedures (UCP) scope. Federal and state laws and regulations specify which programs and issues do. Not all complaints are within the scope of the UCP, even if they involve alleged violations of law. The issues that may involve filing a complaint under the UCP are found in various state and federal programs that use categorical funds. Please attempt to resolve your complaint following the three steps outlined above (Teacher-Administrator-Executive Director). If you are not able to do to your satisfaction, please review the UCP policies at http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/cp/uc/.